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Beware of product quote phishing scams!

March 31st, 2013 · No Comments

A new type of scam is become more common, in which criminals use requests for a quote to trick businesses into handing over passwords. They do this by providing a link to a site that supposedly holds details of the products they want a quote for, which requires a login using an e-mail address. Here is an example:

Date: Sat, 30 Mar 2013 15:04:07 +0100
Subject: Please send us your data sheets and your price list regarding this product.
From: “Agung .” <agung.suryagungfuniture@gmail.com>

Dear sir/madam,

We are interested in the purchase of your products and services. we want to make order from your company and we are urgently in need of these products. You are advised to log in into our site to view the photos and specifications of the exact products we need ASAP and kindly tell us the cost of the products and the FOB to Durban, Sea Port.

Copy and paste the link to your http://anhuifuhuangimportexport.yolasite.com

NOTE: You can only view this product page if you carefully log in with your exact email and password you are using to communicate with us, as our need products specifications and designs is exclusively for our Company and has been protected for our exclusive right to protect our business.

We earnestly await your swift response to enable us to make deposit payment so that you can start the production immediately.

Kind regards,
Director of Operation

You should never enter the password to your e-mail account (or other passwords such as for Facebook, Google, Amazon, eBay and PayPal accounts) on a site other than the proper website of the service. Furthermore, you should only enter the password on pages protected by SSL (padlock icon visible in the browser, URL starts with http://). Scam sites typically are not SSL-protected.

Tags: Fraud · scams · spam

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